ninafuller

Nina Fuller Fuller itibaren Dâmbovicioara, Romanya itibaren Dâmbovicioara, Romanya

Okuyucu Nina Fuller Fuller itibaren Dâmbovicioara, Romanya

Nina Fuller Fuller itibaren Dâmbovicioara, Romanya

ninafuller

This book is almost impossible to review in some respects - I have a hard time "recommending" it, even though I would want to recommend it to anyone. The use of the n-word, a word which is now extremely difficult to deal with in these times, makes it a tough recommendation. You have to KNOW that you're going to hear or read that word 1000 times before the book is over. If you can handle that and take the word in its historical context then you can get to the meat of the novel. Huck Finn is a hilarious book. Twain uses Huck to make fun of just about every type of personality you can imagine. And Huck spins fantastic yarns, none of which are believable or even good lies whatsoever, but which propel the crux of the story onward into mishap after mishap. Huck's "simple" insights reflect Twain's own maxims and beliefs. In fact, the simplest and most seemingly "stupid" characters are the most naturally intelligent and intuitively emotional characters in the book (and presumably the entire South). Huck makes decisions that go directly at odds with his Christian upbringing and what "folks" tell him is right and wrong - he is guided by his conscience...and he isn't wrong. My favorite portions of the book include the entire segment at the Phelps' farm and Huck's time with the Duke and the King. I laughed out loud repeatedly. The only criticism of the book I would have would be that the ending was too happy for such a dark topic. I know it's Huck and Tom and so they have to be okay... but I feel like ending the book the way he did, Twain did a disservice to the message and the meat of the middle of the book where Huck struggles to know what is right and what is wrong and who to love. Perhaps Twain did so to make it more digestible.