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Jarred Van Rooy Van Rooy itibaren Sarai Lili Urf Berchanpur, Uttar Pradesh 212502, Hindistan itibaren Sarai Lili Urf Berchanpur, Uttar Pradesh 212502, Hindistan

Okuyucu Jarred Van Rooy Van Rooy itibaren Sarai Lili Urf Berchanpur, Uttar Pradesh 212502, Hindistan

Jarred Van Rooy Van Rooy itibaren Sarai Lili Urf Berchanpur, Uttar Pradesh 212502, Hindistan

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Translating...

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Beş yıldız çünkü bu harika bir eserdi. Gerçek Hikaye için dört yıldız. Bu YA serisiyle birlikte gelen yetişkin dizisini okudum, bundan hoşlandım. Aksi nasıl okuduğundan emin değilim.

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I am officially in love with Pearl Buck. What an amazingly skillful writer! There is so much to say about this book. First, the themes are right up my alley -- so much of the plot revolves around gender, religion, class and cross-cultural relationships. The story is set in China, specifically in a region in the mid 1800's where groups of Jewish people settled to escape persecution. The family at the center of this novel struggles with identity, each family member in a different way. The father is the child of a Jewish man and a Chinese woman. The mother is ardently Jewish and wants her only son to find a Jewish wife, particularly in the daughter of the local rabbi, for she is of a similar class as well. The son is not sure if he loves the Jewish girl that his mother has chosen or a Chinese woman or Peony, his bondservant (also Chinese). Peony, of course, is the focus of this novel, but she is largely a peripheral character, in regard to her station in life. Much of the rising action and conflict happens around her, not to her. This position as insider/outsider makes her perspective particularly intriguing. Buck somehow manages to avoid the stereotypical. This is partially because of her knowledge of the craft of fiction -- no character in this narrative is demonized. Each has his or her own set of motivations, and every turn in the story is motivated by decision. What's truly amazing is that I honestly could not predict how this story would end. I couldn't even decide how I wanted it to end -- that's how well Buck depicted each character's desires. Buck also manages to not demonize religion, but she certainly calls it to task in terms of cultural imperialism. --- I love this book already, and I'm only 50 pages in. (I would have continued quoting, but then this review would be 10 page in length -- so many good lines!) Peony is a little poet: "The peach flowers bloom upon the trees, Not knowing whether the frosts will kill them. ... The hot sun burns, the thunder drums across the sky. The cicadas sing endlessly, unheeding. ... The red leaves fall, and all the court is still. I tread the leaves and under my feet they die. ... Snow covers the living and the dead, The green pine tree, the perished flowers. These four poems she read very often, wondering how she could improve them. Whether she would ever be able to make them better she did not know. But at present they reached to the bottom of her heart and made her want to cry." ___ And I love this passage about Leah's mother's last words to her: "Take care of your father, Leah -- and Aaron [your brother]." "Yes Mother," she had sobbed. "Oh, child," her mother had gasped suddenly, "think of yourself -- for no one else will." Those were her mother's last words ,and Leah did not know what they meant then or now. How could she care for others if she thought of herself?