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Edu Rubio Rubio itibaren Perkamil, Tikala, Manado City, North Sulawesi, Endonezya itibaren Perkamil, Tikala, Manado City, North Sulawesi, Endonezya

Okuyucu Edu Rubio Rubio itibaren Perkamil, Tikala, Manado City, North Sulawesi, Endonezya

Edu Rubio Rubio itibaren Perkamil, Tikala, Manado City, North Sulawesi, Endonezya

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Forster has this great line about Woolf; he says that, just as he's about to write something about her, he finds that he's misplaced his pen. Then he goes on to talk about how you can only really appreciate Woolf when you're writing about her, which is a lovely way of saying that Woolf is a writerly writer in the Barthesian sense: she demands that you put something of yourself into the novel, that you become active in the writing process in order to experience the narrative. But then, as Forster points out, she sometimes makes you feel like you've misplaced your pen. This isn't my favourite of Woolf's novels, but it is a fascinating read: it's pure character, all dialogue that exits not-quite at the level of internal monologue, but not-quite at the level of day-to-day discourse, either. The language is deeply poetic and moving; like the waves that are its central metaphor, the book carries you along very gently. If you enjoy it, I recommend an article called "Brittania Rules the Waves," which talks about the connections of this seemingly-character oriented, apolitical novel to British imperialism. Very, very smart. If you're new to Woolf, I wouldn't start here - I'd start with Jacob's Room, which is wonderful - but this is certainly a captivating book to read and thus is not to be missed.